Miss Emily No Es Here

Kanye, Mariah, and Miss Kevin Spacey guide the way. They make me do bad things to people who are mean to me. They find me. Whisper things.

Apr 20

beawilderment:

he’s making it hop

this is the only thing I care about

(via neoliberalismkills)


Apr 13

(via mrgolightly)


Apr 8
“Well, let me just put a stop to this shit right now. You can give me gold-plated day care and an awesome public school right on the street corner and start paying me 15% more at work, and I still do not want a baby. I don’t particularly like babies. They are loud and smelly and, above all other things, demanding. No matter how much free day care you throw at women, babies are still time-sucking monsters with their constant neediness. No matter how flexible you make my work schedule, my entire life would be overturned by a baby. I like my life how it is, with my ability to do what I want when I want without having to arrange for a babysitter. I like being able to watch True Detective right now and not wait until baby is in bed. I like sex in any room of the house I please. I don’t want a baby. I’ve heard your pro-baby arguments. Glad those work for you, but they are unconvincing to me. Nothing will make me want a baby.

And don’t float “adoption” as an answer. Adoption? Fuck you, seriously. I am not turning my body over for nine months of gaining weight and puking and being tired and suffering and not being able to sleep on my side and going to the hospital for a bout of misery and pain so that some couple I don’t know and probably don’t even like can have a baby. I don’t owe that couple a free couch to sleep on while they come to my city to check out the local orphans, so I sure as shit don’t own them my body. I like drinking alcohol and eating soft cheese. I like not having a giant growth protruding out of my stomach. I hate hospitals and like not having stretch marks. We don’t even force men to donate sperm—a largely pleasurable activity with no physical cost—so forcing women to donate babies is reprehensible.”

The Real Debate Isn’t About “Life” But About What We Expect Of Women | The Raw Story (via brutereason)

"So, reading those three paragraphs above? I bet at some point you recoiled a bit, even if you don’t want to have recoiled a bit.  Don’t I sound selfishHedonistic? Isn’t there something very unfeminine about my bluntness here? Hell, I’m performing against gender norms so hard that even I recoil a little.

This is actually what I think, and I feel zero guilt about it, but I know that saying so out loud will cause people to want to hit me with the Bad Woman ruler, and that causes a little dread. Why do we feel this way?

What kind of training and socialization did we receive that made us think there’s something terribly wrong about a woman who is hurting no one and is actually pretty nice but wants what she wants in her private life and doesn’t apologize about it? Is there a reason that we should bully women into pretending that they’re more interested in being selfless and eternally nurturing than they actually are, even at great cost to themselves?”

(via voicesforchoices)

(via nanner)


Apr 5
labsinthe:

"Neo Romantic" Abbey Lee Kershaw photographed by Emma Summerton for Vogue Italia 2009

labsinthe:

"Neo Romantic" Abbey Lee Kershaw photographed by Emma Summerton for Vogue Italia 2009

(via fortheloveofsequins)



Apr 3
littlefroggies:

pussybow:

quinningthewar:

I’ve found it. After years of searching I’ve finally found a word that means ‘they got the booty’. My life is complete. 

i love finding new ways to describe myself!

i don’t normally reblog stuff but UUMMMMMMMM yes

littlefroggies:

pussybow:

quinningthewar:

I’ve found it. After years of searching I’ve finally found a word that means ‘they got the booty’. My life is complete. 

i love finding new ways to describe myself!

i don’t normally reblog stuff but UUMMMMMMMM yes

(via nanner)


newsweek:

When I heard that my 21-year-old son, a student at Harvard, had been stopped by New York City police on more than one occasion during the brief summer he spent as a Wall Street intern, I was angry.
On one occasion, while wearing his best business suit, he was forced to lie face-down on a filthy sidewalk because—well, let’s be honest about it, because of the color of his skin. As an attorney and a college professor who teaches criminal justice classes, I knew that his constitutional rights had been violated.
As a parent, I feared for his safety at the hands of the police—a fear that I feel every single day, whether he is in New York or elsewhere.
Moreover, as the white father of an African-American son, I am keenly aware that I never face the suspicion and indignities that my son continuously confronts. In fact, all of the men among my African-American in-laws—and I literally mean every single one of them—can tell multiple stories of unjustified investigatory police stops of the sort that not a single one of my white male relatives has ever experienced.
What I Learned About Stop-and-Frisk From Watching My Black Son - The Atlantic

newsweek:

When I heard that my 21-year-old son, a student at Harvard, had been stopped by New York City police on more than one occasion during the brief summer he spent as a Wall Street intern, I was angry.

On one occasion, while wearing his best business suit, he was forced to lie face-down on a filthy sidewalk because—well, let’s be honest about it, because of the color of his skin. As an attorney and a college professor who teaches criminal justice classes, I knew that his constitutional rights had been violated.

As a parent, I feared for his safety at the hands of the police—a fear that I feel every single day, whether he is in New York or elsewhere.

Moreover, as the white father of an African-American son, I am keenly aware that I never face the suspicion and indignities that my son continuously confronts. In fact, all of the men among my African-American in-laws—and I literally mean every single one of them—can tell multiple stories of unjustified investigatory police stops of the sort that not a single one of my white male relatives has ever experienced.

What I Learned About Stop-and-Frisk From Watching My Black Son - The Atlantic

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)


Apr 2
ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts (Source)

ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts (Source)


Mar 31

(via thesaltgod)


(via thesaltgod)




Mar 30

taylorswiftisawinchester:

sad-butsassy:

devourer-of-gods:

No, this is why women survive longer than men.

this hurt to look at

actually it’s true. in sociology we learn about the fact that men participate in more risky behavior to prove masculinity and this is a way the patriarchy hurts men and pat of the reason the life expectancy is longer for women

(via i-want-cheese)


sagansense:

awkwardsituationist:

light pollution is largely the result poorly designed lighting, which wastes energy shining outward to the sky, where it is unwanted, instead of downwards to the ground, where it is needed. billions are spent each year on unshielded outdoor lights, though they are directly responsible for 14.7 million tons of carbon dioxide waste in the u.s. alone.

our overlit cities and suburbs have radically altered the light rhythms to which many forms of life, including diurnal animals such as ourselves, have adapted, disrupting the migratory, reproductive and feeding cycles of nocturnal creatures in potentially devastating ways.

light, for example, makes nocturnal animals easier prey, and acts as a magnet for birds, with the latter effect so powerful that scientists speak of some birds being literally “captured” by searchlights, circling in the thousands until they drop. the effect was notably observed in new york’s tribute of lights.

the effect on humans is just as profound. darkness is not only essential to our biological welfare (with links to breast and prostate cancer), but the light of the stars and the rhythms of day and night is part our collective evolutionary and cultural patrimony. yet, two thirds of humanity live under skies polluted with light, while one fifth of planet can no longer see the milky way.

photos by jim richardson from his series “death of night,” to consider during earth hour, which is saturday, march 29 at 8:30pm.

Learn more about light pollution, the conservationists of our Earthly skies - the International Dark Sky Association, learn about the Hidden Costs of Light Pollution, watch the PBS documentary ‘The City Dark’, and learn about/participate in the 'Globe At Night' citizen science campaign to preserve out night skies.

(via abcstarstuff)


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